‹ Past is Prologue

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A few nights ago at far too late an hour I ended up watching the entire unveiling of the first iPhone back in 2007. I’m not sure I ended up on the subject, but in the end I stuck around for the entire 80ish minutes because it was such an interesting relic of technology history.
The Athletic (subscription needed) asked their beat reporters to share the best book on their team and Scott Burnside picked this for the Hurricanes: The Hartford Whalers: Images of Sports | Brian Codagnone This book, which published 10 years after the Whalers’ 1997 relocation and rebirth as the Carolina Hurricanes, is described as a pictorial tribute to their NHL history in Hartford.
Since the world went on lockdown during what should have been spring break, I’ve been logging the daily COVID-19 numbers provided by both Oklahoma (where I live) and Connecticut (where my parents live) in a Google Docs spreadsheet. Now nearing the middle of June, the two charts look drastically different.
Dennis Banks passed away on October 29, 2017. On November 1, 2017 I filed a Freedom of Information Act request with the FBI for any files related to Banks. Most of the FBI files related to the American Indian Movement have been public for a number of years but I was curious to see if the FBI would release anything new Banks following his death.
Here’s a little article I pulled from a digital copy of The Indian, May 28, 1970: The Indian, May 28, 1970 What really drew my attention to the article was the blending of traditional identity with contemporary rock music, then I decided to see if they ever managed to get that record made.
It’s appropriate that political reporter Dave Weigel has released The Show That Never Ends: The Rise and Downfall of Prog Rock in 2017. Just after we’ve finished one of the most divisive elections (and the Democratic party continues to hold a primary fight for some reason) we get a survey of the most divisive subgenre of rock music.
When I went away to start my undergrad I was not only a pretty socially awkward person (alert: still am), but I had my own computer for basically the first time in my life. Prior to getting a Dell laptop to start college I had always used desktops everyone in the family shared.
Apr 03, 2017
In January 2013 the New York Times public editor wrote a column discussing how front page obituaries in 2012 “became something less than a rarity.” According to Margaret Sullivan the total number of front page obituaries for 2012 was 30, or less than ten percent of all front pages that year.
Dec 31, 2016
Spent a weekend with the monks at Clear Creek Abbey Saw Bruce Springsteen in concert for the first time Won a $6,000 summer research fellowship Presented at a conference in Hawaii (and spent a week exploring Oahu) Travelled close to 3,000 miles on a research trip Saw the Goo Goo Dolls (and Collective Soul) in concert
As a historian of Native American history I have three major conference options to present research and meet people in the field: the Western History Association, Ethnohistory, and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. Each of these conferences have their perks and their uses—the WHA combines all topics of American West history, Ethnohistory is the traditional home for the study of Native Americans that combines anthropology and history, and NAISA highlights the growing field of indigenous studies which includes topics outside the US.
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