Bob Engelhart’s Golden Hill Paugussett Cartoon

In her book, Cash, Color, and Colonialism: The Politics of Tribal Acknowledgement, Renee Cramer made a passing reference to a cartoon in the Hartford Courant on the controversy over the potential federal acknowledgement of the Golden Hill Paugussetts in Connecticut. The small tribe, mostly located in the southwest part of the state, had a large percentage of members with African American heritage, which hindered their application for recognition because they didn’t “look Indian.

The West, The Wild West, and California

Monday’s freshman American history survey ended with the students having to write about what the defined as the west and what would fall into the “wild west.” Most of the students tended to favor a geographic approach to the west with the general consensus being anything from roughly Oklahoma to the Pacific was “the west.

Always Take First Hand Accounts With a Grain of Salt

One of the many books I picked up today at the library was We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement, a good looking large glossy text produced by the Minnesota Historical Society Press which included photographs by Dick Bancroft and text by Laura Waterman Wittstock.

Who’s to Blame for Anna Mae Aquash’s Death?

The New York Times Magazine published a piece of the death of Anna Mae Aquash, an AIM activist murdered in 1976, last month: On Feb. 24, 1976, a rancher in South Dakota was installing a fence on land situated along the edge of Pine Ridge Indian Reservation when he spotted a body at the bottom of a 30-foot embankment.